The Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig

is a research museum of the Leibniz Association

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[16.11.2020] The researchers Jorge Brito (Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Quito, Ecuador), Claudia Koch (Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany), Alexandre Percequillo (Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil), Nicolás Tinoco (Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador, Quito, Ecuador), Marcelo Weksler (Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Miguel Pinto (Observatorio de Biodiversidad Ambiente y Salud, Quito, Ecuador) and Ulyses Pardiñas (Instituto de Diversidad y Evolución Austral, Puerto Madryn, Argentina) point out that although the new genus i
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[12.11.2020] A cooperation between Cameroonian and German researchers was started recently that aims at improving our knowledge concerning the status and the ecology of the Buffon’s kob antelope (Kobus kob kob, Erxleben 1777). A first outcome of the cooperation is this study now published conducted in Faro National Park, in Northern Cameroon. Located to the West of the Bénoué Complex, is very rich in biodiversity. It is considered a key site for the Cameroon’s protected area network. The results are remarkable: the population size decreased dramatically by 80%. Because the species plays an important role in maintaining the equilibrium of the trophic web, it is absolutely necessary to get more knowledge about the distribution, abundance and ecology of the Kob antelope. Effective conservation strategies and sustainable management of protected areas should be defined in a forceful wildlife management plan.
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[06.11.2020] More plant diversity, less pesticidesSpecies-rich plant communities help to naturally reduce herbivore impacts.Leipzig/Jena/Minnesota/Bonn. Increasing plant diversity enhances the natural control of insect herbivory in grasslands. Species-rich plant communities support natural predators and simultaneously provide less valuable food for herbivores. This was found by a team of researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), who conducted two analogous experiments in Germany and the USA.
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[26.10.2020] Two new salamander species are part of Ecuador's fauna since the beginning of October 2020. Due to the progressive destruction of their habitat, the rare species are already threatened. The discovery was made by an international team of scientists from Ecuador, USA, Great Britain, India, and Germany, who surveyed the biodiversity of Ecuador's northwestern foothills and examined material from various museum collections. The two species are assigned to the genus Oedipina, of which 38 species have been known to date. They occur from southern Mexico to the northwest of South America between sea level and 2,320 m. Surprisingly, until now only one species of the genus was known from Ecuador - and only from two individuals.
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[19.10.2020] Ethiopia is known for its highly endemic and rich herpetofaunal diversity shaped by its biogeographical patterns. Here, a new species of skinks, Trachylepis boehmei sp. nov., is described from the Ethiopian Highlands.The huge herpetological collection of the Museum Koenig includes several specimens of skinks, which were already collected almost 50 years ago in the high altitudes west of the African Rift Valley. Based on these individuals a new species of skink with the scientific name Trachylepis boehmei has now been described in the magazine Zootaxa.
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[26.05.2020] "When it comes to chameleons, most people think of the splendid play of colors that is related to intraspecific communication or camouflage", says Dr. Markus Lambertz, zoologist at the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn (University of Bonn, Germany) and the Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig – Leibniz-Institut für Biodiversität der Tiere (ZFMK, Museum Koenig). Madagascar, however, harbors species that follow a quite different strategy. Many leaf chamelons of the genus Brookesia are small and brownish animals that live cryptic in the understorey.
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[20.11.2019] Since these groups are among the most diverse beetles representing nearly half of all living beetle species the authors of the study are convinced that these events were among the most important triggers for the successful evolution of beetles. Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes appear to have been key to the Mesozoic diversification of herbivorous beetles. Remarkably this incorporation of genes occurred in two independent events.
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[22.10.2019] A new study examines these classic hypotheses by shining a light on the early history of Lepidoptera, the order that includes moths and butterflies. Using the largest-ever data set assembled for the group, an international team of researchers created an evolutionary family tree for Lepidoptera and used fossils to estimate when moths and butterflies evolved key traits. Their findings show that flowering plants did drive much of these insects' diversity. In a surprise twist, however, multiple moth lineages evolved "ears" millions of years before the existence of bats, previously credited with triggering moths' development of hearing organs.
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[15.10.2019] Sometimes scientists need years to dtermine the exact status of an animal species. This happened to bats caught by Bonn zoologist Jan Decher and his team during an environmental impact assessment in 2008 in a rainforest in Guinea. These animals have now been described by a group of authors from Bonn and Eswatini as part of a revision as a new genus and species Parahypsugo happoldorum. The new species is named in honor of David and Meredith Happold, both of whom have written important works on bats in Africa and much of the 6-volume standard work "The Mammals of Africa" ​​(2013).
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[14.05.2019] Today, the three-dimensional visualization and analysis of biological samples using computer tomography (CT) is a routine procedure. However, in the past it was very difficult to visualize the fine surface details of many organisms. Scientists at the Universities of Cologne and Bonn and the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig – Leibniz Institute for Animal Biodiversity in Bonn have now developed a new method to digitally capture and display even the finest surface structures.
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