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[23.05.2017] Madagascar, a tropical island off the coast of east Africa, is home to many plants and animals found nowhere else in the world. The invertebrates found on Madagascar are as spectacular as the island's charismatic lemurs and Baobab trees. The millipede fauna is particularly impressive. Madagascar is home to the giant pill-millipedes. Pill-millipedes have the ability to roll into a sphere and these “giants” (by millipede standards) can reach the size of a baseball when rolled-up.
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[15.05.2017] The angel shark family (Squatinidae) is the second most threatened group of sharks and rays in the world. The Angelshark (Squatina squatina) was once widespread throughout the Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, however it has now almost disappeared throughout its natural range, mainly due to overfishing. Today, the Canary Islands is the last refuge for the Angelshark, but here too they are under threat. One key factor preventing effective conservation is lack of detailed scientific information about their ecology.However, there is still hope to save these angels.
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[31.01.2017] Natural indigenous forests are rarely found in South Africa. They only cover 0.6% of the countries area and only survived in protected gorges and on mountain slopes. Among others, this is due to fires which are utilized to retain farmland but also to preserve the likewise ecologically valuable grassland and the typical South African fynbos (“fine bush”) vegetation. Despite their small extent these forests hold a rich flora and fauna, constituted of species that only occur there.
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[18.01.2017] From time to time one has notice from a single newly discovered species from the remote depth of oceans or of rain forests. However, how badly we know the life on Earth shows a work recently published in the "Bonn zoological Bulletin" by Dirk Ahrens und Silvia Fabrizi, scientists from the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig – Leibniz-Institute for Biodiversity of animals (ZFMK) in Bonn. They discovered at one blow 127 new species of mini chafers (scarab beetles of the tribe Sericini) from the Indian subcontinent.
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[15.12.2016] An Action Plan to save one of the world’s most threatened shark species from extinction was today unveiled by a partnership of leading conservation organisations.
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[01.12.2016] The massive decline of over 75% insect biomass reported from Germany between 1989 and 2013 by expert citizen scientists proves the urgent need for new methods and standards for fast and wide-scale biodiversity assessments.
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[18.11.2016] “Evolution has brought up some weird animals, such as the caseids.” says Dr. Markus Lambertz, zoologist at the University of Bonn and the Museum Koenig. Caseids are “mammal-like” reptiles that lived about 300-250 million years ago. Especially the barrel-shaped trunk got Dr. Lambertz’ attention. How did these reptiles breathe? Exceptional joints impeded rib motility and allowed for only limited inhalation. Calculations revealed that the ventilatory system was not that effective, but still sufficient for a sedentary grazer.
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[06.07.2016] This temporary display shows newer and recent work of Wolfgang Hartwig. His drawings detailing the shape of the objects in high resolution were used for the print of reputable and renowned bird books such as COLLINS Field Guide.Highlight of this small, but nice exhibition is an enormous mounted lion. The exhibition will run until October 10th 2016.There is no extra charge for this exhibition; the regular entrance fee (5 euros, reduced rate 2,50 euros) applies.
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[31.05.2016] German scientists assessed the impacts of climate change for the global distribution of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis in collaboration with an international team. With the help of mathematical models the research found that the current populations in Europe will increase driven by the projected impact of climate change. The study was now published in the renowned journal PLoS One.
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[06.04.2016] Researchers of the Zoological Research Museum Alexander Koenig, Bonn, Germany and the Senckenberg Forschungsinstitut Dresden, Germany, who worked in close collaboration with scientists from the USA, Thailand, and Cambodia, recently discovered a new turtle species in northeastern Thailand which was subsequently described as Malayemys khoratensis, in the scientific journal PloS One.
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