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Tegmina-size variation in a Neotropical cricket

AutorInnen: 
Martins Lima, R., Schuchmann, K.-L., Tissiani, A.S., Andrade Nunes, L., Jahn, O., Ganchev, T.D., Gonçalves Lhano, M., Isaac Marques, M.
Erscheinungsjahr: 
2018
Vollständiger Titel: 
Tegmina-size variation in a Neotropical cricket with implications on spectral song properties
Org. Einordnung: 
Publiziert in: 
Journal of Natural History
Publikationstyp: 
Zeitschriftenaufsatz
DOI Name: 
https://doi.org/10.1080/00222933.2018.1457728
Keywords: 
Bioacoustics; geometric morphometrics; Grylloidea; Pantanal wetlands
Bibliographische Angaben: 
Martins Lima, R., Schuchmann, K.-L., Tissiani, A.S., Andrade Nunes, L., Jahn, O., Ganchev, T.D., Gonçalves Lhano, M., Isaac Marques, M. (2018): Tegmina-size variation in a Neotropical cricket with implications on spectral song properties. Journal of Natural History 52: 1225-1241. doi:10.1080/00222933.2018.1457728
Abstract: 

This study evaluates the relationship between shape and size of tegmen, harp, mirror, and spectral range of calling song frequency of a Neotropical cricket subpopulation (Lerneca inalata beripocone. In addition, we compare intraspecific morphological divergence and calling song properties between individuals from different sites of the Pantanal of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Regression analysis showed that the dominant and maximum calling song frequencies were negatively correlated with tegmen size, i.e. frequencies are either lower or higher depending on the corresponding size variation in resonance structures of the forewings. Canonical variable analysis demonstrated marked intraspecific differences in morphometric characters between localities of a
L. inalata subpopulation c. 35 km apart (SESC-Pantanal Advanced Research Base and Pouso Alegre Farm, Mato Grosso, Brazil). Lerneca inalata beripocone at SESC had larger forewings than conspecifics from Pouso Alegre Farm. These morphological variations of wing properties related to reproductive behaviours were interpreted as fitness parameters, likely shaped by restricted gene flow during temporal habitat isolation episodes. Such isolation patterns occur in the Pantanal wetlands for several months during the annual hydrological cycle.